Working Papers

From Fast Food to Baseball:
Teaching Useful Grammar and Conversation
to Japanese University Students

R. Jeffrey Blair
contact information
Aichi Gakuin University, Nisshin, Japan

http:// www3.aichi-gakuin.ac.jp / ~jeffreyb / research / ffBball.html
rough machine translation ... [ Eng=>Jpn ]

Abstract

ab here.

        English education in Japan is a mystery. How do Japanese students spend six years in junior high and high school studying English without learning to use it? Too many lectures ... too much reading, writing, and translation ... too much grammar ... not enough conversation practice? That's all water over the dam by the time they show up in my university classes. The challenge for me is to provide a path for them ... from what they know ... to real English communication. After 30 years of teaching at a language school, a junior college, and in my university I believe the key is

      to keep it simple--simple vocabulary, simple grammar,
      a simple pattern of conversation--and in context.


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Simple Words in Context

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Macro Grammar: SVO

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Micro Grammar: Noun Phrases

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Micro Grammar: Verb Forms

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Transformations Using McGrammar Slots

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Baseball Conversations

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Conclusions


Acknowledgments

        I wish to express my sincere thanks to xxx for valuable critical comments on earlier drafts and encouragement. Not all of the advice received was necessarily heeded, however, and I retain full responsibility for the final product.
        This paper is gratefully dedicated to my daughter Nagisa Blair. She introduced me to the Five Basic Sentences and asked me to explain them. I hope this paper accomplishes that task in a way that is fun and useful.

Points of Contact

        Any comments on this article will be welcomed and should be mailed to the author at Aichi Gakuin University, General Education Division, 12 Araike, Iwasaki-cho, Nisshin, Japan 470-0195 or e-mailed to him. Other papers and works in progress may be accessed at http:// www3.aichi-gakuin.ac.jp/ ~jeffreyb/ research/ index.html .

References

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Pinker, Steven (1999).Words and Rules: The Ingredients of Language. Perennial.

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Working Papers
http://www3.aichi-gakuin.ac.jp/~jeffreyb/research